BG / EN
Home » News » News » The World of the Celts. Centres of Power – Treasures of Art Exhibition shows Celtic artifacts from the permanent exposition of NIAM-BAS
The World of the Celts. Centres of Power – Treasures of Art Exhibition shows Celtic artifacts from the permanent exposition of NIAM-BAS

25.09.2012
Under the title The World of the Celts. Centres of Power – Treasures of Art, Baden-Württemberg State Museum of Archaeology and Württemberg State Museum (Landesmuseum Württemberg) in the German province of Baden-Württemberg present an extraordinary exhibition on the Celts from the first millennium B.C., and their role as one of the formative powers in the European history. 
 
From September 15th 2012 till February 17th 2013 the visitors of Württemberg State Museum can enjoy the largest exhibition of Celtic artifacts discovered in Europe in the course of the last thirty years. Two main thematic sections – Centres of Power and Treasures of Art present remarkable finds some of them never before shown in Germany. The section of Centres of Power traces the development of the Celtic civilization in Central and Western Europe during 7th – 1st c. B.C. – from the Iron Age till the arrival of the Romans. The Treasures of Art section focuses on the unique artistic work of the ancient Celts as the first significant contribution of this Northern civilization to the European history of art. More details on the exhibition find on www.kelten-stuttgart.de
 
The National Institute of Archaeology with Museum of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (NIAM-BAS) takes part in the exhibition presenting seven artifacts from a burial in Mal-tepe Tumulus near Mezek village, Svilengrad region. The monumental tholus in Mal-tepe Tumulus was discovered in 1931 by residents of the village. Prof. Bogdan Filov and Dr Ivan Velkov, curator at the National Museum of Archaeology in Sofia, conducted the archaeological research. They revealed entirely the entrance of the tomb and discovered two graves under it. Prof. Filov dated the tomb from the 4th c. B.C. and recognized it as descending from the type of Mycenae beehive tombs. The tomb contained golden jewels, golden, bronze and ceramic vessels, bronze objects, an iron pectoral, and many other artifacts. All of them entered the National Museum and now are on display in the permanent exposition of NIAM-BAS.
 
The grave goods from the tomb – heroon in Mezek provoke exciting academic discussions as some of them seem to be quite unusual for Thrace. These are the objects made of bronze now in the exhibition in Württemberg. Prof. Filov has not defined the function of these objects and their interpretation still rouses great academic interest. In 1941 Dr P. Jacobstahl identified them as elements of a Celtic chariot. This interpretation puts forward the problem of the Celts on the Balkan Peninsula and of the relations between Celts and Thracians in 4th – 3rd c. B.C. 
 


Upcoming
Publications
Arheologia (Sofia)
Accessible for people with disabilities