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The Thracian golden treasure from Golyamata Mogila (Omurtag’s = Big Tumulus) near Sveshtari village on display in the National Museum of Archaeology

15.11.2012
On November 14th the National Museum of Archaeology housed a press conference to present the newly found Thracian golden treasure from Golyamata (Omurtag’s) Mogila near Sveshtari village. Ass. Prof. Diana Gergova, leader of the NIAM-BAS team exploring the biggest tumulus from the necropolis in Sboryanovo National Archaeological Reserve introduced the treasure. The Director of NIAM-BAS, Ass. Prof. Lyudmil Vagalinski and Deputy Director of NIAM-BAS, Ass. Prof. Bony Petrunova also attended the press conference.

For the strong interest, the press conference was held in the Central Room of the Museum. Alongside the media representatives, many colleagues archaeologists and historians also attended the event, as well as general public eager to see the spectacular archaeological find.

Ass. Prof. D. Gergova talked on the long-term studies in Sboryanovo National Archaeological Reserve and the discovery of the Thracian golden treasure. The treasure occurred on November 7th 2012 in the filling of the tumulus. It was in the evening and the team headed by Dr. Gergova had to work all night long. The golden pieces had been put in a wooden casket. The Thracian golden treasure comprises a diadem, four multi-spiral bracelets, a finger ring with the image of Eros, buttons, a forehead piece and appliques of a horse harness, as well as an iron bridle. The soil was sieved to reveal many miniature golden threads. Probably they show that the jewels had been covered with fine brocaded fabric. The total weight of the pieces is over 1,8 kg. Primarily the treasure is dating from the late 4th – early 3rd c. BC.

According to Dr. Gergova the treasure had been deposited as a gift to Gods in the course of accumulating the tumulus, probably related to the funeral of Kotella King of the Gettae. She supposes the golden hoard is associated with the rituals the Gettae performed in order to allow the immortalization of their king. 

The golden treasure found in Golyamata (Omurtag’s) Mogila is the first one for the last ten years that enters the depot of the National Museum of Archaeology.  The jewels are already on display within the permanent exposition of the Museum waiting for their visitors.

The reportage on the press conference is available on the website of news.bg.
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